©Copyright 2001 D F Curran

 

SEQUENCING #2:

You Asked for it:  Another Sequencer

This month we have a second sequencing puzzle. We call it the Sequencer because it is based on the type of logic used to solve how DNA molecules are made up. DNA molecules are so big they are hard to figure out unless they are broken down first. Enzymes break the DNA into smaller sequences which can be identified by chemists. By using a number of different enzymes that only break molecules at specific places, and counting and identifying the smaller pieces each produces, scientists can figure out how the DNA molecule would have to be put back together, and thus what it's makeup is.

In our case instead of a DNA molecule we'll be piecing together a short cryptogram that Fishy cut up with an axe. You'll have to use logic to put the cryptogram back together. Then you'll have to solve it.

Click Here for detailed solving example.

HTTP://shootyourfilm.com/ShootYourfilm.com

One of Fishy's Favorite Comebacks

Many people complain to Fishy about not having enough time to do things. This is Fishy's favorite comeback to such commments.

Fishy turned this saying into a cryptogram. In the cryptogram Fishy made, the 4th character represents a space throughout the entire cryptogram. (You'll need to change it back before you solve the cryptogram.)

Fishy carved the cryptogram on a hand-hewn pine board. When he was done he chopped the board into pieces.

First he split the board into pieces splitting between the C and K. ( In all cases only going from left to right not the reverse.)

Then he split the board between V and T.

Finally he split the board between C and L.

When he had split them at all of these connections, he had twelve pieces:

L
KUC
KUC
LJV
LJV
LJYC
KJTKSIC
TKWRKSIC
TKWRKWAYKUC
KUDGKDLKJTKSIC
TWSKIDBJTVKCTWAVIKSJOC
KUDGKJLKTWSKLWKOAMIKDKRDAPSKJTKSIC

The sizes of the pieces in this sequence we'll call S1S2S3  =1, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 14, 22, 34

If Fishy split the board only where C and K connected he would have sections ( we'll call them S1) measuring 7, 14, 14, 22, 22, 34

If Fishy split the board only where V and T connected he would have sections (S2) measuring 16, 28, 69

If Fishy split the board only where C and L connected he would have sections (S3) measuring 1, 4, 14, 28, 66

If Fishy split the board where C and K connected, and where V and T connected  he would have had sections (we'll call this S1S2 because it uses a combination of  the cuts for S1 and  S2. ) measuring   6, 6, 7, 8, 14, 16, 22, 34

If Fishy split the board where C and K connected, and where C and L connected he would have had sections  (S1S3) measuring 1, 3, 3, 4, 7, 11, 14, 14, 22, 34

If Fishy split the board where V and T connected, and where C and L connected he would have had sections (S2S3) measuring 1, 3, 3, 4, 11, 25, 66

In summary:

S1 = 7, 14, 14, 22, 22, 34
S2 =16, 28, 69
S3 = 1, 4, 14, 28, 66
S1S2 6, 6, 7, 8, 14, 16, 22, 34
S1S3 1, 3, 3, 4, 7, 11, 14, 14, 22, 34
S2S3 1, 3, 3, 4, 11, 25, 66
S1S2S3 =1, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 14, 22, 34

Can you put the pieces back together and then solve the cryptogram?

Solution

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